Archive for February, 2012

Charity Art Auction March 10th

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Support this great charity here in Atlanta. They provide free furniture to the people who are working hard to get back up from some blows that life has dealt them.

Date, Time and Tickets

Whitespace Gallery - Inman Park

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The art of Tommy Taylor is being exhibited at the White Space gallery in Inman Park. When I first walked in, I was greeted by his really neat paintings. I favor pop art and well done pop art like KAWS which I recently saw at the High.

Tommy painted a mural on a local building that has received mixed reviews from the community. Click to see mural.

http://whitespace814.com

@emilyamygallery - busy lady

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I wonder if Emily does all these twitter post?

@emilyamygallery

looking forward to talking with David Mendoza next week.

glad to have Susan Kendrick as a friend.

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art & Architecture: Three-volume set

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The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture is the most comprehensive reference work in this complex and diverse area of art history. Built on the acclaimed scholarship of the Grove Dictionary of Art, this work offers over 1,600 up-to-date entries on Islamic art and architecture ranging from the Middle East to Central and South Asia, Africa, and Europe and spans over a thousand years of history.

Recent changes in Islamic art in areas such as Afghanistan, Iran, and Iraq are elucidated here by distinguished scholars. Entries provide in-depth art historical and cultural information about dynasties, art forms, artists, architecture, rulers, monuments, archaeological sites and stylistic developments. In addition, over 500 illustrations of sculpture, mosaic, painting, ceramics, architecture, metalwork and calligraphy illuminate the rich artistic tradition of the Islamic world. With the fundamental understanding that Islamic art is not limited to a particular region, or to a defined period of time, The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture offers pathways into Islamic culture through its art.

Oxford University Press More Info

The New Art History: A Critical Introduction

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The New Art History provides a comprehensive introduction to the fundamental changes which have occurred in both the institutions and practice of art history over the last thirty years.

Jonathan Harris examines and accounts for the new approaches to the study of art which have been grouped loosely under the term ‘the new art history’. He distinguishes between these and earlier forms of ‘radical’ or ‘critical’ analysis, explores the influence of other disciplines and traditions on art history, and relates art historical ideas and values to social change.

Structured around an examination of key texts by major contemporary critics, including Tim Clarke, Griselda Pollock, Fred Orton, Albert Boime, Alan Wallach and Laura Mulvey, each chapter discusses a key moment in the discipline of art history, tracing the development and interaction of Marxist, feminist and psychoanalytic critical theories.

Routledge More Info

The Jesuits and the Arts, 1540-1773

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The Jesuits and the Arts, 1540&1773 is the first survey ever published of the Jesuits’ global artistic enterprise in Europe, Asia, and the Americas, from the foundation of the Society of Jesus in 1540 to its suppression in 1773. Here the Jesuits’ extraordinary commitment to the arts — the subject of a groundswell of recent scholarly work — comes spectacularly alive, with 476 full color, high resolution images of Jesuit buildings, paintings, sculpture, theatrical sets, and music from around the globe, many of them published here for the first time. No other book dealing with this aspect of the Jesuits’ activities is as comprehensive or as profusely illustrated. Authors of the twelve essays are leading specialists from Italy, Germany, Austria, France, Spain, Argentina, and the United States; some of them are published here in English for the first time.

After John W. O’Malley’s introductory essay “The Cultural Mission of the Society of Jesus,” Giovanni Sale discusses first the principles that guided the Jesuits in design and construction of their churches and residences, and then, in a second essay, the tension between the Jesuits and Cardinal Alessandro Farnese, the imperious patron of their most important church, the Gesù in Rome. With a dazzling command of his material, Richard Bösel next takes the reader on an architectural tour of Jesuit churches, chapels, schools, residences, and meeting halls in Europe, spanning the Continent from France to Slovakia, from Spain to Poland and Lithuania, and from Rome to Antwerp. Gauvin Alexander Bailey leads a similar tour to show the influence of Italian painting on Jesuit art throughout Europe, after which Heinz Pfeiffer discusses Jesuit iconography and, especially, the often-frustrating efforts of the Jesuits to obtain a “true” portrait of Saint Ignatius. Marcello Fagiolo presents one of the least known but most fascinating aspects of Jesuit engagement with the arts: the construction of elaborate temporary “stages” in their churches for the celebration of the Eucharistic devotion of the “Forty Hours.”

Saint Joseph’s University Press  More Info

Art Nature Dialogues: Interviews With Environmental Artists

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Art Nature Dialogues offers interviews with artists working with, in, and around nature and the environment. The interviews explore art practices, ecological issues, and values as they pertain to the siting of works, the use of materials, and the ethics of artmaking. John K. Grande includes interviews with Hamish Fulton, David Nash, Bob Verschueren, herman de vries, Alan Sonfist, Nils-Udo, Michael Singer, Patrick Dougherty, Ursula von Rydingsvard, and others.

SUNY Press More Info

Art Net: The Life and Times of Walter Robinson

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Ask anyone about Walter Robinson, and they mention three things. The first is his art: the skill in his figurative work; the audacity of his spin paintings; his quasi-disappearance from the art world. “He is one of the most underrated, unknown, undervalued artists of the late 20th century,” Barry Blinderman, director of Illinois State University’s galleries and one of his former dealers, said.

go to article…

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and Friends: Expressionism from the Swiss Mountains

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